Let Go (author unknown)

Let Go (author unknown)

I want to share something that I received at a class/support group I attended this Spring. I've been dealing with highly stressful and sad family situations for a long time, and this class provided much insight. I will always be thankful that I attended it and for the people I met there.

This is one of the resources we received in our class materials. I think these points (reminders) can apply to many different relationships and circumstances. I hope it provides some encouragement for someone here, as it did for me.

"Let Go" (author unknown)

To let go does not mean to stop caring. It means I can't do it for someone else.

To let go is not to cut myself off. It's the realization that I can't control another.

To let go is to allow someone to learn from natural consequences.

To let go is to realize when the outcome is not in my hands.

To let go is not to care for, but to care about.

To let go is not to fix, but to be supportive.

To let go is not to judge, but to allow another to be a human being.

To let go is not to expect miracles, but to take each day as it comes, and cherish myself in it.

To let go is not to criticize or regulate anybody, but to try to become what I dream I can be.

To let go is not to regret the past, but to grow and live for the future. To let go is to fear less and to love more.

Let Go (author unknown) was last modified: June 29th, 2014 by KayBee
Published in Senior Chatters

17 thoughts on “Let Go (author unknown)

  1. Linda

    Thank you for sharing. I have had to let go of several things in my life. By doing so, I released the load on my heart, the pain of keeping connected to that situation that gave me pain, and freed me up to move forward instead of staying in the past. It is an ongoing thing, you may have to go back and let go again if necessary. But eventually you will let go for good…. at least the pain, maybe not the memory.

  2. lani36

    Lettin go is so hard , yet for our own health and happiness we must try, ocasionly ,i know I go back and visit the sadness , but it becomes less and less as the years progress, one day I hope i will waken to a new day where i have completely let go of the anxst,,, thank you for your post Kaybee.xxx.

    1. KayBee Post author

      Thanks Much, Lani. Healing takes time, no doubt about it. We still have scars after healing has occurred too. One thing I appreciate about this site, is that most people encourage each other to keep trying, loving and moving forward.

  3. macathy

    Manny times in our lives we get to the stage we need to let go.There is often hurt involved ,but I always find by letting go makes me a stronger person.By letting go I don’t mean we have to cut that thing or person from our lives ,but we have to deal with it ,and I have to forgive ,even if they don’t forgive I do,if it’s my fault or not.I need this so I can then move on.
    Good post Kay thanks

    1. KayBee Post author

      Thank you also, Mac. Yes, we need to take responsibility to deal with the difficult situations, even when it feels easier to run away from them. I agree, forgiveness is a big part of truly letting go. None of this easy stuff. I am glad there is help available through faithful family, friends, and even groups like I attended. Some things seem too big to tackle alone.

  4. PollyPie

    Letting go are two wise words, but so difficult to do.
    I moved 4000 miles to ‘let go’, and repair myself, but 10 years later I still haven’t been able to let it all go completely. Ive had doctors put stitches in these emotional wounds, and some of the scars are still clearly evident, but others are still weeping. Buggers just won’t heal up. But Im still trying. Will I get there? Who knows.
    Thanks for sharing this Kay. A great insight.

    1. roseinbloom

      PolliePie. You express your pain so well and I understand. Time usually helps and I hope it does in your case, but what is gone will always be gone and you may need to see your life as it is now and accept it as the new you and a new reality.Living with a lot of emotional and physical pain is part of growing older it seems.

  5. rose1943

    Hi, I’m new here but your blog truly moved me. I had gone through 15 years of therapy in my life. Group therapy, one on one, you name it. The last therapist helped me the most. She used Neurolinguistic Programming. Sounds complicated but it wasn’t. This totally changed my perspective about my home, parents and abuse, etc. I have no words to describe how much that did for me. That was one good thing. But each and every morning after I wake up, I write in my journal. I’ll write everything I’m thinking and feeling….I get it out. It helps me. Also I try to meditate a little bit…it doesn’t have to be long but just try to still my mind…letting the thoughts go….it takes a while to get used to it and takes discipline….and I still struggle everyday but I’m making it. I’ve raised my children without ‘ruining’ them, I have a good marriage. I’m retired so I have to work hard deciding what to do…my husband is still employed so I’m alone 5 1/2 days of the week to try to motivate myself to make a good life. I’m still here. I’m making it and my heart goes out to anyone that is going through any mental health issues. My dad didn’t make it, he used suicide because he couldn’t handle it. That was sad, but I’m grateful I found some tools to use and the wonderful people like you to be able to vent this out to. God bless………Rose1943

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