• WINDOWS 11

     The_Real_Bruce updated 4 months, 2 weeks ago 4 Members · 5 Posts
  • dollybloo62

    Member
    December 27, 2021 at 10:21 pm

    Windows 11 is ready to upgrade just now so a word of warning … please read the reviews before installing this upgrade .. unfortunately i didnt and wish i had … i didnt like it at all .. the task bar is on the bottom and i like mine on the right hand side .. there is no way on w/11 to move the bar . you have 10 days to restore your computor back to windows 10 . you will need to go into settings – system – restore then follow instructions .. ps everytime your computor needs an upgrade it will re-install windows 11 i found tto my cost the other day when i was shutting down, i had to go back into system restore and pause upgrades for 9 days ..i soppose i will have to keep doing that now and therefore my laptop will never get any upgrades.. unless there is anyone on here who can help ..

  • grahamh 

    Member
    December 27, 2021 at 11:23 pm

    Hi dollybloo62,
    I had a look at moving at moving the taskbar to the right. I think the only way is to change it is to modify the associated registry key. Don’t try this, you could really mess up your PC if you get it wrong. I used to have it on the right with my laptop.
    Graham

  • bob_deb 

    Member
    December 29, 2021 at 9:57 am

    Many thanks for the insight you have provided on Windows 11 which is being vigorously promoted at the moment by Microsoft, very similar to the manner in which Windows 10 was promoted some years ago. It is important to remember however that, despite the urging to upgrade, Win 10 is fully supported by Microsoft until 14th October 2025 and there is no real need to upgrade to Win 11 prior to then. Win 11 is surrounded by a number of stringent conditions contingent upon its’ installation, one of the most troubling from my point of view being the necessity to create a microsoft account. I have doggedly refused to do so on my 3 Win 10 machines, using a local account as preference on each one despite their efforts over the last few years to make it progressively more difficult to do so, to the point now that you virtually have to resort to subterfuge to achieve it. In Win 11 you have no option other than a MS Account, relinquishing the last thread of local control. Another troubling aspect from my point of view is the relinquishing of Internet Explorer as an inherent application in Win 11. I still regularly use an imaging application which has a dependancy upon IE and, unless I can somehow replicate that dependancy within Win 11, it marks the end of the line for the imaging application which has served me well since 2006. I assemble my own desktop PC’s and am in the throes of creating one that will support Win 11, not because I have any great interest in advancing to it, but purely to allow me to experiment on methods of achieving what I want from the OS, not what Microsoft says I mujst have.

  • bob_deb 

    Member
    January 15, 2022 at 5:30 am

    Having chosen the most appropriate hardware components for my needs I assembled a desktop PC upon which to install Win 11. I did a ‘clean’ install of a $94 (AUD) home version and the only hiccup in the installation was a very minor one, the BIOS of the motherboard I purchased needed upgrading from Ver 7 to Ver 9 in order for it to support Win 11. When you consider that the motherboard was only a few months from manufacture to my purchase it shows how dynamic an environment the digital world is. No dramas though, the ‘flash file’ was available online at no cost and it only took a few minutes to complete the upgrade. My initial reaction is that is very similar to Win 10 and anyone who is comfortable with Win 10 will have no trouble adapting to it. I was deeply concerned that I may not be able to install my Digital Imaging application but employing the same subterfuge I use with Win 10 of sneaking it in the back door while the OS is kept busy guarding the front door I met with success. How long that success will last is anybodys’ guess as Microsoft are portending rendering Internet Explorer totally defunct in the near future. As my imaging app has a dependency on IE it may well spell the end. My biggest disappointment so far is that my perfectly good Canon MG7160 Printer/Scanner does not (and will not) have a driver compatible with Win 11 so I’ll have to use it in conjunction with one of several laptops at my disposal. Although somewhat inconvenient, it isn’t the end of the world and I’m actually surprised that it is the only casualty suffered so far. Even though I only commissioned it yesterday it very quickly acquired a ‘same old – same old’ feel about it when compared to Win 10 and I feel that anyone who is hoping for some dynamic uplift in their computing activities may be somewhat disappointed.

  • The_Real_Bruce

    Member
    February 14, 2022 at 4:04 am

    I like Windows 11 very much. That awful cluttered WIN10 menu has gone. The rest is pretty much as before.
    The icons on the task bar are centred which takes a bit to get used to (I have no idea if you can change that) not a big problem otherwise I am happy with WIN11

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